7 Racial Sobriety Essentials.

If you are in 12 step recovery or think you might be addicted, these 7 essentials will help you navigate the healing process in the recovery rooms as a person of colour.

  1. You need to educate yourself to understand the psychology of racism. 
  2. Be honest about the impact of racism on your life. You can’t change what you don’t understand about yourself.  
  3. Explore the dysfunctional/ addictive survival patterns you used to avoid your pain. 
  4. Use your tools, cultural top and bottom lines will keep you safe and build racial self esteem.
  5. Keep yourself safe from 13th step predetors, especially if you are new to recovery. 
  6. Build your support network and be mindful of how interracial sponsorship or therapy could block your healing.
  7. For all my seasoned fellows in recovery, start your own POC meeting in your primary fellowship. The mirroring and identification is beyond powerful! 

Watch the free webclass below for a deeper breakdown. Go to www.racialsobrietyrooms.com to get your ticket to the conference.

‘How can I embrace black beauty when I’m tired of feeling ugly?’

It’s difficult to love our blackness when we’re constantly being fed that we’re ugly via the system of racism. In this webclass, I break down the truths you need to explore to reclaim your body and celebrate your black femininity.

  1. Where did you learn/internalise that blackness was ugly?
  2. How was racism internalised and acted out as self hate in your family/community?
  3. What are the negative internal scripts you say about yourself and your identity?

Once you have told the truth about these questions in your journal or within a safe space, you will have a deeper understanding of what narrative is yours and what belongs to your dysfunctional environment. Join me and a group of other healing sista’s at the sista circle to share, heal and explore solutions to honour and nurture your blackalicious beauty!

For more details of links in this training go to www.heal.juneallen.net

For the Rise of the Sacred Sista class go to www.rise.juneallen.net

How to deal with a mother that doesn’t support your happiness.

It’s devastating when the women who is supposed to be cheering you on cannot. This can leave wounded daughters with shame and low self worth. In this webclass I share reasons why your mother behaves this way and then I share 5 ways to take care of yourself in this situation.

  1. Self nurturing /parenting.
  2. Be mindful of what you share and boundary the deeper conversations that feel unsafe. 
  3. Think about what you would do if a sista friend behaved the same way. Use your answer to set new boundaries.
  4. Love her from a distance. 
  5. Build your village of mums,  friends and support systems on and offline.

All the relevant links in the class can be found at www.heal.juneallen.net

How to Heal When the Village is Wounded.

*Abuse Trigger Warning*

With so much stuff in the news recently around #muterkelly a sista asks, ‘It takes a village to raise a child, but how can we heal when the village is wounded?’

This is an important topic because many of us get so caught up in the savagery of white supremacy, that it’s hard to look honestly at what’s going on in our community. In today’s video I share 3 ways we can take care of ourselves when dealing with toxicity in the community.

  1. Find a safe, non judgmental space to process your feelings. This could be a therapist, addiction recovery meeting, or a support group. The goal is to find a space that oozes empathy and compassion.
  1. Focus on your own pain and healing first, the village heals collectively as you do the work individually.
  2. Build your own safe village. Many of us grew up in homes that didn’t feel safe so an important part of healing is letting go of trying to change family members who are emotionally unavailable to hear you.
    If you are looking for a safe space start or compliment your journey, go to www.sistacircle.juneallen.net to join the Bell Hooks book club.

Faith : Kwanzaa Day 7

Imani (Faith): To believe with all our hearts in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

Faith is defined as having complete trust in someone or something. It can also be anchored in spiritual conviction rather than proof.

Under the system of racism, the unheard, recycled pain within our families mean that many of us have lost faith in ourselves and each other.

The restoration of faith requires us to first rebuild the faith within ourselves. To keep our promises to ourselves. As we begin to believe in ourselves, we will attract people, places and things which will restore our faith.

Affirmation: I have faith in the virtues of my ancestors to restore Maat (balance and harmony), and bring peace within myself, across the diaspora and the planet.

Last day to get your Kwanzaa offers at kwanzaa.juneallen.net

 

Creativity: Kwanzaa Day 6

Today’s principle is all about Creativity (Kuumba) : To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.

Creativity is the sacred expression of Ra in motion. It’s our ability to transcend ‘traditional’ ideas, expectations and patterns to create original, progressive and imaginative ways to externalise our Higher Self.

Affirmation: Today, I will share my melanin magic with the world, and shine fearlessly in my greatness.

Purpose (Nia) : Kwanzaa Day 5

Nia (Purpose): To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.

Your purpose is defined as the reason for creating, or doing something. It’s our intentional engagement with something that has deep meaning.

Racism white supremacy is set up for us to be driven by fear of embracing our purpose, our culture, our empowerment, our healing. When we abandon our purpose, we set ourselves up for a life and legacy of unhappiness.

Affirmation: Today, I commit to exploring my truth so I can live in my purpose and be of service to the community from a place of wholeness.

Living in your purpose requires black self love and confidence so download your empowerment offers at kwanzaa.juneallen.net

Cooperative Economics: Kwanzaa Day 4

Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics): To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.

Toni Morrison tells her students, ‘When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else.’

So as we build our careers, be it working for others or ourselves, we cheer on our gifted community and share honestly (with love) when things need improvement.

Affirmation: I am willing to receive prosperity and abundance. I build a powerful legacy of wealth with my community.

Abundance seeds on the inside, so download the Kwanzaa Savers guide to reflect, rise and reconnect to your blacknificence. www.kwanzaa.juneallen.net

 

Collective Work and Responsibility: Kwanzaa Day 3

Collective Work and Responsibility – Ujima : To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers’ and sisters’ problems our problems and to solve them together.

To be responsible is about acknowledging your duty of care, to be accountable for a person, place or thing. Internalised racism often means that working together and looking out for each other is a challenging task. We turn this around by staying committed to rebuilding ourselves so we can rebuild our communities.

Affirmation: I am my solution. I am my brotha/sista’s keeper.

If you’d like more awareness around your internalised racism, download the Kwanzaa Savers guide to reflect, rise and reconnect to your blacknificence.

www.kwanzaa.juneallen.net

 

Self Determination: Kwanzaa Day 2

Kwanzaa Day 2 is about Self-Determination (Kujichagulia). To define and name ourselves, as well as create and speak for ourselves.

The definition of self-determination is the act of making up one’s own mind about what to think or do, without outside influence. Living under the system of racism means that our thinking is often filled with negative thoughts about our blackness.

Today, remember that you can choose to embrace and honour your cultural values without apology.

If you’re feeling disconnected around your identity, download the Kwanzaa Savers guide to reflect, rise and reconnect to your blacknificence.

www.kwanzaa.juneallen.net