How being an angry black woman can heal

Many of us as black women have a painful relationship with anger because we don’t want to be associated with aggression and/or abuse. It’s not easy dealing with the oppressive intersection of race and gender so it makes sense why so many of us don’t know how to manage our intense rage. If used appropriately, anger can be a powerful catalyst for change so in this week’s live, I share 3 ways that being an angry black woman can lead us to healing.  

5 adult personality types from childhood abandonment

If you were raised in a home where caregivers were physically or emotionally absent, this will have an impact on the dynamics in your relationships. In this week’s book club we explore chapter 5 from, ‘What mama couldn’t tell us about love’  which is all about the impact of abandonment through 5 personality traits. In the live stream, I share my take on these survival behaviours that keep us from the love we deserve.   

‘I’m stuck in negative thinking!’

Without a safe space to process, many of us have buried difficult feelings for years. Therefore, it makes sense that our negative thinking is the emotional leaking out of a difficult past. An important part of the healing process is understanding that it’s not linear. There is no golden destination and sometimes there will be moments when things just feel sh*t as the layers come off. In this week’s live, I share the 5 tools I use when this funk gets in the way. 

How to enjoy the Healing Process

Often times, the healing process is dominated by unpacking our pain, trauma and the challenges of daily living.  However, an important part of the journey is being able to enjoy your growth in the present as well as learning from the past and planning your future.

In this session, I share 3 ways to enjoy the healing process. Use these tools to learn how to bask in the beauty of healing and being your best self right now.

How to practice black mindfulness

With the racist backlash from England losing the football, there is understandably a lot of intense rage and stress from our community at the treatment of these black players. Mindfulness is an important tool for processing difficult emotions but often the cultural context gets missed in the conversation.

In this session, I share 5 principles for effective mindfulness with the additional exploration of how to include what it means for black people living under the system of racism.  

‘I don’t know what my needs are?’

One of the questions that clients often find difficult to answer is what they need. If we were raised in homes that were neglectful and abusive, we shut down because it wasn’t safe to express our feelings or needs. As adults, this pattern can show up as numbness, anger and resentment in people pleasing relationships so in this session, I share a tool that can help you reconnect to your feelings along with 8 important human needs to consider as a black woman.