Body Shame Clap backs 👀

Every time I get dressed, my inner critic laughs at my lockdown love handles, shaming me about what others would say if they saw me naked.

When she pipes up, I say STFU and feel gratitude for the extra curves that kept me alive through this pandemic the racial stress and sadness of loosing my dad.

With lockdown now eased in the UK, some of you have told me that you’re anxious about seeing family over Christmas because they won’t stop opening their toxic mouths about your body.
‘You”ve put on weight.’

“You’re too skinny.’

‘What happened to your hair?’

‘What have you got on?’

Blah blah blah yada yada yada

Sometimes family think they have the right to say mean things just because you’re related. Folks got so much shit to say about you, but can’t get their own crazy lives together.

Repeat after me.

This season, I will stop giving my previous energy to anyone I would not go to for advice. If folks take it upon themselves to verbally assault my body, I will remember that I am a queen and will clap back that my body is my business.

👏🏾 👏🏾 👏🏾 👏🏾 👏🏾

My body is my business.

My body is my business.

My body is my business.

(If you’re feeling brave, keep this one in your back pocket.)

👏🏾 👏🏾👏🏾 👏🏾 👏🏾👏🏾 👏🏾👏🏾

Your toxic mouth is not welcome!

Your toxic mouth is not welcome!

Your toxic mouth is not welcome!

How to start healing the black mother wound.

Last week, hearing about Lauren Hill’s daughter Selah talk about her mothers horrific abuse triggered feelings of anger and sadness. What made this situation more painful was Lauren’s response with justification, deflection and self centering. As a survivor, I was also feeling a lot of gratitude for all the pain I’d worked through to break this generational cycle with my own daughter.

This issue obviously triggered a lot heated discussions on social media so I did this live stream sharing how to being healing this deep core wound.

It Takes a Village?

#juneslovenotes
Last Sunday was my second guest appearance on Goddesses of the Round Table with 6 other black women.
The topic was The Mother Wound which brought up some difficult, but powerful conversations.
One of the sistas talked about the concept of healing through the African proverb, ‘it takes a village to raise a child.’ Whilst I love the idea of this in principle, it always makes me sad because the reality is that our village is deeply wounded.
A lot of elders in our community were (and still are) very abusive, and remain stuck in denial about their need to do the healing work or make any sort of amends to those they hurt. This means that what was once a valuable part of the village, has become unsafe and the consequences are clear in the faces of unhappy children now walking around in adult bodies.
When we’re denied the love and protection we deserve as children, it takes a lot to reach out for help as an adult. If we’re willing to trust the process, a rework of the original quote can give us hope as we build a family of choice. So instead of saying, ‘it takes a village to raise a child’ we can move to,  ‘It takes a healing village to raise an adult child.’ This empowers us while we heal to be more discerning about trusting those who have earned our trust.
Today, I will remember that I have the right to choose peace and blood is not thicker than safety.

20 Ways to manifest more love with the ‘Living in Love’ Program.

To love and be loved is a basic human need. If your childhood experience of love was disrupted by separation, abuse and internalised racism, it will be difficult to give or receive love as an adult. The most important thing to remember as you learn to love is 1. Healing it takes time 2. Love is a verb so you need tools 3. You are not alone and 4. You can’t heal alone! In this live stream, June shares 20 ways to manifest more love with the support of her ‘Living in Love’ online monthly program.